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ANIMALS

1. MINIATURES
Miniatures were created of many different animals. The quantity and geographical dispersal of these animal figures implies that ownership was widespread and that most individuals owned a selection of figures. The sculptures, being light and weatherproof, could be carried on the person and easily concealed. It is not known whether these items were purely for amusement or whether they had some ritualistic significance. Whilst so-called ‘domestic’ animals were popular figures (cats, dogs, birds and even horses were frequently kept in people’s homes and gardens in the oil age period), ‘exotic’ and rare wild animals were also a frequent choice and may have been used as a kind of talisman as many of the species declined and disappeared (ironically often as a result of persecution by humans themselves). There is some evidence that animals, such as tigers and sharks, were believed to have special mystical powers and that in some regions their body parts were eaten in order to access these properties.

click on pictures to see larger images:

horse camel dog turtle
dolphin cat turtle serpent

2. OTHER
click on pictures to find out about the objects:

photosynthetic fleece

deer pills balloon
catpaw spine spider head massager
fish bat polystyrene tray catseye
wing cast bee mammoth CD
fish charm pods    

 

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or click on a specific collection:
health/hygiene
- animals - food/drink - gender - travel - warfare - beliefs - living space
clothing/decoration - entertainment - energy - childhood - desire - trade - miscellaneous

   

 

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RESIDENCY OPPORTUNITY

Inspired by our collections? Then you may be interested in a short residency in the studio at Woodlands in Suffolk.

find out more here

 
   
 


to see more of Fran's work, visit www.flyintheface.com

   
 
 
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